Education

What young people want to help them recover from school closures

Many children suffered from too much time spent playing alone during lockdown. Robert Collins | Unsplash, FAL Michaela James, Swansea University Children need help to recover from the disruption COVID has brought to their schooling. Much of the focus – and government funding – has been on academic catch-up. Some schools are beginning to trial adding an hour to the …

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Virtual exchange: What are students signing up for?

Since the pandemic introduced travel restrictions and disrupted campus life, some students are searching for alternative ways to get international learning experience. (Shutterstock) Hiba B. Ibrahim, York University, Canada Many students are drawn to culturally immersive experiences that support their personal growth and academic performance. Offering students the chance to study abroad is an integral part of how many post-secondary …

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International student numbers hit record highs in Canada, UK and US as falls continue in Australia and NZ

Shutterstock Peter Hurley, Victoria University and Melinda Hildebrandt, Victoria University International students are heading to Canada, the UK and the US in record numbers despite the pandemic, new research by the Mitchell Institute at Victoria University shows. But Australia and New Zealand continue to experience a dramatic drop in new international students. The Mitchell Institute report on the global impact …

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Early childhood educators feel burnt out and undervalued. Here’s what we can do to help

Shutterstock Penny Levickis, The University of Melbourne; Amelia Church, The University of Melbourne; Jane Page, The University of Melbourne; Lisa Murray, The University of Melbourne, and Patricia Eadie, The University of Melbourne Australian early childhood educators feel burnt out and undervalued. Our research reports on more than 200 educators’ experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic, which exposed existing strains on the …

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Learning to read starts earlier than you might think: five tips from an expert

Learning to read. aijiro/Shutterstock Karen Boardman, Edge Hill University Learning to read does not begin when a child puzzles over the words in a book for the first time. In the early weeks of their lives and even before birth, babies are skilfully processing important information about the sounds they hear. They are attuning to tones, patterns of language and …

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Grammar still matters – but teachers are struggling to teach it

Willem Hollmann, Lancaster University Do you know what a suffix is, or how to distinguish adjectives from adverbs? If you have a six or seven-year-old, the chances are they do. Or at least, the UK government now says they should – by the end of year 2, to be specific. In year 3, primary schoolers turn their attention to prefixes …

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What schools teach about 9/11 and the war on terror

A survey of U.S. history teachers found they teach about 9/11 primarily on the date of the anniversary. Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images Jeremy Stoddard, University of Wisconsin-Madison and Diana Hess, University of Wisconsin-Madison The phrase “Never Forget” is often associated with the terror attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. But what does this phrase mean for U.S. students …

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There’s a reason your child wants to read the same book over and over again

Possum Magic again, are you for real kid?! from www.shutterstock.com Jane Herbert, University of Wollongong and Elisabeth Duursma, University of Wollongong We often hear about the benefits of reading storybooks at bedtime for promoting vocabulary, early literacy skills, and a good relationship with your child. But the experts haven’t been in your home, and your child requests the same book …

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Violence against children carries a huge cost for Africa: governments need to act urgently

Getty Images Rongedzayi Fambasayi, North-West University Every day, millions of children experience violence in one form or another. It is a global problem that cuts across colour, class, educational status, income, ethnicity and origin. It has immediate, long term and irreparable impacts on the life, survival, physical and psychosocial development and well-being of children. Violence against children also has financial …

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Studying maths post-GCSEs aids brain development – should it be compulsory?

Alexei Vernitski, University of Essex and Alexander Partner, University of Essex Teenagers who stick to maths beyond the age of 16 have greater levels of certain brain chemicals that are critical for cognitive development, according to new research from the University of Oxford. The researchers, led by cognitive neuroscientist Roi Cohen Kadosh , found that students who dropped maths at …

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