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Health & Medicine

3 mRNA vaccines researchers are working on (that aren’t COVID)

from www.shutterstock.com Archa Fox, The University of Western Australia and Damian Purcell, The Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity The world’s first mRNA vaccines — the COVID-19 vaccines from Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna — have made it in record time from the laboratory, through successful clinical trials, regulatory approval and into people’s arms. The high efficiency of protection against severe …

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COVID-19: does exercising really reduce the risk?

Monkey Business Images/Shutterstock Jamie Hartmann-Boyce, University of Oxford A new US study shows that people who are less physically active are more likely to be hospitalised and die with COVID-19. According to these new calculations, being inactive puts you at a greater risk from COVID-19 than any other risk factor except age and having had an organ transplant. If this …

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More kids are being diagnosed with ADHD for borderline (yet challenging) behaviours. Our new research shows why that’s a worry

from www.shutterstock.com Luise Kazda, University of Sydney During my daughter’s challenging first year of school, we discovered how much effort it took her to sit and learn. She was the youngest in her class, placing her at higher risk of being diagnosed with ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder). While she struggled with attention and hyperactivity, her problems were always more …

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Yes, there is structural racism in the UK – COVID-19 outcomes prove it

Vanessa Apea, Queen Mary University of London and Yize Wan, Queen Mary University of London The release of the Commission on Race and Ethnic Disparities report has generated a groundswell of negative reaction, specifically of disappointment and frustration. The report minimises structural racism, a reality for so many that negatively impacts on their opportunities to achieve their full potential. It …

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The common cold might protect you from coronavirus – here’s how

The common cold is usually caused by a rhinovirus. Shutterstock/fizkes Matthew James, Queen’s University Belfast We often assume that viral infections are caused by individual virus types. But in reality, we’re exposed to many viruses on a day to day basis, and co-infection – where someone is simultaneously infected by two or more virus types – is quite common. The …

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Bacteria ‘shuffle’ their genetics around to develop antibiotic resistance on demand

To stop antibiotic resistance, scientists need to know how bacteria become resistant. Jarun Ontakrai/ Shutterstock Celia Souque, University of Oxford Antibiotic resistance – the ability of harmful bacteria to survive treatment by antibiotics – is a growing threat. It is making it harder to treat life-threatening infections, including tuberculosis, MRSA, and gonorrhoea – and increasing the risks of even minor …

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COVID-19: men create more antibodies after asymptomatic infections and keep them for longer – new research

maybealice/Shutterstock Jessica Williams, Cardiff Metropolitan University As COVID-19 has swept across the globe, it seems that high transmission rates have partly been driven by a large number of people catching the virus, not experiencing symptoms and then unknowingly passing it on. Despite this, the screening of asymptomatic people for signs of infection hasn’t been widespread, due to costs and limits …

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What is thrombocytopenia, the rare blood condition possibly linked to the AstraZeneca vaccine?

Shutterstock Anthony Zulli, Victoria University; Maja Husaric, Victoria University; Maximilian de Courten, Victoria University, and Vasso Apostolopoulos, Victoria University The federal government has asked Australia’s medical and vaccine regulators to urgently consider the European Medicines Agency’s finding of a possible link between the Oxford/AstraZeneca COVID vaccine and rare blood clots. This follows reports over recent weeks of blood clots in …

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Does coffee burn more fat during exercise? What the evidence tells us

Participants consumed the equivalent of a tall brewed filter coffee 30 minutes before exercise. Pavel3d/ Shutterstock Neil Clarke, Coventry University Coffee, green tea and other caffeinated drinks are a popular way to start the morning. Not only does it give many people a much-needed boost, but caffeine can also help when it comes to fitness. Studies show it can help …

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