World

Viral videos of racism: how an old civil rights strategy is being used in a new digital age

Mourning in Minneapolis: Terrence Floyd at a vigil for his brother George Floyd on the spot where he died in police custody. Tannen Maury/EPA

<h1 class=”legacy”>Viral videos of racism: how an old civil rights strategy is being used in a new digital age</h1> <span><a href=”https://theconversation.com/profiles/sage-goodwin-1040749″>Sage Goodwin</a>, <em><a href=”https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-oxford-1260″>University of Oxford</a></em></span> <p>After a black bird-watcher filmed a white dog-walker on May 25 calling the police on him in response to his request she obey the dog-leash laws in the Ramble woodlands area of Central Park, …

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What Ramadan means to Muslims: 4 essential reads

Women pray at a mosque during the first day of the holy fasting month of Ramadan on May 6 in Bali, Indonesia. AP Photo/Firdia Lisnawati

Women pray at a mosque during the first day of the holy fasting month of Ramadan on May 6 in Bali, Indonesia. AP Photo/Firdia Lisnawati Kalpana Jain, The Conversation During the month of Ramadan, Muslims around the world will not eat or drink from dawn to sunset. Muslims believe that the sacred text of Quran was first revealed to Prophet …

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The impact of Brexit on relations between the UK and Gulf countries

Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II greets Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman at Buckingham Palace in central London on March 7, 2018. Dominic Lipinski/AFP

Hassan Obeid, INSEEC U. On January 31, the United Kingdom will cease to be a member of the European Union and regain its status as an “independent” trading partner. Over the course of 2019, the country ramped up its efforts to sign up trading partners and was able to establish 20 bilateral “continuity” agreements covering 50 countries or territories. While many …

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In India’s cities, life is lived on the streets – how coronavirus changed that

Divyakant Solanki/EPA

Lakshmi Priya Rajendran, Anglia Ruskin University India’s coronavirus lockdown of 1.3 billion people is unprecedented in size and scope, particularly in a country where city streets are so thronged with life in all its guises. After an initial three-week shutdown, the Indian prime minister, Narendra Modi, announced the lockdown would be extended until May 3. Mobility data from Google published …

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Microplastics: tiny crustaceans can fragment them into even smaller nanoplastics

Gammarus duebeni, the shrimp-like animal that can break down microplastic. Alicia Mateos Cárdenas, Author provided

Gammarus duebeni, the shrimp-like animal that can break down microplastic. Alicia Mateos Cárdenas, Author provided Alicia Mateos Cárdenas, University College Cork Microplastics are widespread in seas and oceans, and their harmful effects on many different marine animals are well known. However, we know relatively little about the microplastics in our freshwater rivers, streams and lakes. We still don’t know exactly …

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About-face: politicians switch from vilifying burqas to mandating masks

Yui Mok/PA

Nilufar Ahmed, University of Bristol People in the UK will be soon be required by law to wear masks in shops to prevent the spread of coronavirus. This follows the introduction of mandatory face coverings on public transport in June. There is evidence that supports the public health benefits of wearing face coverings in public. But the UK government and …

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Sending international students home would sap US influence and hurt the economy

Some colleges may have to scramble to make plans to keep international students enrolled. Boston Globe/Getty Images

Some colleges may have to scramble to make plans to keep international students enrolled. Boston Globe/Getty Images David L. Di Maria, University of Maryland, Baltimore County Editor’s Note: This story was originally published on July 8 to explain a policy rule issued on July 6. The Trump administration announced on July 14 that the policy rule had been rescinded. U.S. …

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Why protesters are fed up with Sudan’s tricky transition

A Sudanese demonstrator at a protest in the capital Khartoum. Ashraf Shazily/AFP via Getty Images

A Sudanese demonstrator at a protest in the capital Khartoum. Ashraf Shazily/AFP via Getty Images David E Kiwuwa, University of Nottingham In the last few days, tens of thousands of people have, once again, taken to the streets of Sudan’s major cities to demand “freedom, peace and justice”, the rallying cry for the protesters who ousted Omar al-Bashir in 2019. …

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Herd immunity: why the figure is always a bit vague

Herd immunity

hobbit/Shutterstock Adam Kleczkowski, University of Strathclyde Nearly 100 years ago, two British researchers, William Topley and Graham Wilson, were experimenting with bacterial infections in mice. They noticed that individual survival depended on how many of the mice were vaccinated. So the role of the immunity of an individual needed to be distinguished from the immunity of the entire herd. Fast …

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