TimeLine Layout

September, 2021

  • 21 September

    ‘I’m not afraid of terrorism. I’m afraid of being accused of being a terrorist’: growing up Muslim after 9/11

    Lukas Coch/AAP Randa Abdel Fattah, Macquarie University Those born after 2001 have only known a world “at war on terror”. This means a generation growing up under fears and moral panics about Muslims and unparalleled security measures around their bodies and lives. In my new book, Coming of Age in the War on Terror, I look at what this has …

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  • 21 September

    COVID-19: why infection rates among double-vaccinated older adults look worse than they are

    Colin Angus, University of Sheffield Recently, ITV journalist Robert Peston caught COVID, despite being double vaccinated. This set Peston wondering how common it is for the fully vaccinated to get the disease. His analysis is now complete. The headline is fairly alarming: “Data shows infections high among double vaxxed for those aged 40 to 79.” Although, perhaps not as alarming …

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  • 21 September

    Loneliness, loss and regret: what getting old really feels like – new study

    Sam Carr, University of Bath and Chao Fang, University of Bath Paula* had not been living in her retirement apartment for very long when I arrived for our interview. She welcomed me into a modern, comfortable home. We sat in the living room, taking in the impressive view from her balcony and our conversation unfolded. Paula, 72, told me how …

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  • 20 September

    ¿Qué podemos aprender del poeta Walt Whitman?

    Walt Whitman, 1887. George C. Cox / United States Library of Congress’ Antonio Fernández Vicente, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha A quien quiera vivir: Aquí hallará algunas sencillas lecciones de Walt Whitman, uno de los padres del trascendentalismo, nacido hace ya 200 años. Viva deliberadamente y experimente por sí mismo No permita que otro le cuente lo que es la vida. …

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  • 20 September

    Russia’s state broadcaster RT going all-out to boost legitimacy of rigged Duma election

    Precious Chatterje-Doody, The Open University and Ilya Yablokov, University of Sheffield Russia goes to the polls on September 19 to elect a new Duma – the country’s legislature. Russian elections are not known for their unpredictability – United Russia, the party linked to the president, Vladimir Putin, tends to come away with more than half of the vote. The remainder …

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  • 20 September

    Cholesterol jab: why gene silencing drugs may work better than current treatments

    The jab would be given twice a year. Girts Ragelis/ Shutterstock Aristides Tagalakis, Edge Hill University The NHS has very recently approved a new cholesterol-lowering jab which will be offered to 300,000 people over the next three years. The drug – inclisiran – will be administered twice a year as an injection. It will mainly be prescribed to patients who …

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  • 20 September

    Multiple sclerosis linked to infection in adolescence – new study

    New Africa/Shutterstock Scott Montgomery, UCL Multiple sclerosis (MS) is most often diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50. Certain genes put a person at greater risk of getting this disease of the central nervous system, but scientists are still trying to understand the triggers. My colleagues and I have been studying these triggers for many years. Our earlier research …

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  • 19 September

    Elon Musk’s Tesla Bot raises serious concerns – but probably not the ones you think

    Andrew Maynard, Arizona State University Elon Musk announced a humanoid robot designed to help with those repetitive, boring tasks people hate doing. Musk suggested it could run to the grocery store for you, but presumably it would handle any number of tasks involving manual labor. Predictably, social media filled with references to a string of dystopian sci-fi movies about robots …

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  • 19 September

    Do the northern lights make sounds that you can hear?

    John A Davis/Shutterstock Fiona Amery, University of Cambridge It’s a question that has puzzled observers for centuries: do the fantastic green and crimson light displays of the aurora borealis produce any discernible sound? Conjured by the interaction of solar particles with gas molecules in Earth’s atmosphere, the aurora generally occurs near Earth’s poles, where the magnetic field is strongest. Reports …

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  • 19 September

    Endometriosis: gene identified which could be potential treatment target – new study

    Endometriosis can be an extremely painful condition. Jelena Stanojkovic/ Shutterstock Krina Zondervan, University of Oxford and Thomas Tapmeier, Monash University Up to 10% of women experience endometriosis worldwide. The condition is chronic, extremely painful, and can result in infertility. Endometriosis happens when tissue similar to the lining of the womb (the endometrium) grows outside of the womb, in the abdominal …

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