TimeLine Layout

July, 2021

  • 1 July

    Many of us feel ‘empty’ – understanding what it means is important for improving our mental health

    Many of us may have described feeling ‘empty’ before. fizkes/ Shutterstock Shona Joyce Herron, UCL and Fabio Sani, University of Dundee It’s likely you have felt “empty” at some point in your life – or perhaps you’ve heard someone else describe themselves in that way. But while this might be a relatively common feeling, it’s often not spoken about as …

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  • 1 July

    Rethinking how we look at Africa’s relationship with China

    The framing of Africa’s relationship with China needs a rethink. Shutterstock Christopher J. Lee, Lafayette College The topic of China-Africa relations presents an opportunity to rethink the territorial parameters of African studies. In particular, it can help shift attention away from the Atlantic world as the dominant focal point of connections between Africa and the wider world. The problem is …

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  • 1 July

    France’s decision to pull troops out of the Sahel invites a less military approach

    A less militarised approach could lead to greater security in the region. Daphne Benoit/AFP via Getty Images Folahanmi Aina, King’s College London France recently announced plans to close its military operation battling Islamist militants in the Sahel region of West Africa. President Emmanuel Macron said the mission would be replaced by an “operation of support and cooperation with armies in …

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June, 2021

  • 30 June

    COVID-19: Extending the gap between vaccine doses was the right thing to do

    Paul Hunter, University of East Anglia Increasing the gap between COVID-19 vaccine doses (up to a maximum of 12 weeks) was one of the more controversial decisions made by the UK government during the pandemic. Medical experts came out for and against the plan when it was announced in January 2021. Faced with the new delta variant, experts are once …

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  • 30 June

    COVID linked to loss of brain tissue: but correlation doesn’t prove causation

    alexialex/Shutterstock Francois Balloux, UCL Early in the pandemic, it became clear that COVID-19 wasn’t just a disease of the lungs. The heart, kidneys and liver could also be affected. Many patients also suffered from neurological problems, including “brain fog”, loss of a sense of smell and taste, and stroke. Now, a new study from the University of Oxford suggests that …

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  • 29 June

    How a national student database could cheapen the college experience

    The proposed database would focus on income. Andy Sacks/Getty Images Nicholas Tampio, Fordham University The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has proposed that the federal government create a database that includes information on outcomes for individual college graduates, such as how much money they earn after they get a degree in a particular major. That’s according to a report that …

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  • 29 June

    Heart block: cause of condition which affects endurance athletes identified in study using racehorses

    Most young athletes with heart block typically don’t experience any symptoms. lzf/ Shutterstock Alicia D’Souza, University of Manchester Endurance athletes (such as triathletes, footballers, or marathon runners) can be some of the healthiest people in society. Yet paradoxically, some can also be prone to developing a range of heart rhythm disturbances (known as arrhythmias) as a result of exercise. There …

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  • 28 June

    COVID-19 vaccines: why it’s important you get your second dose

    Rebecca Aicheler, Cardiff Metropolitan University Vaccination is the safest way to gain immunity to the coronavirus, and with most COVID-19 vaccines, you need two doses to get the greatest possible protection. Immunologists call this method of giving people multiple doses “prime-boosting”. Essentially, you first teach the immune system what it is looking for – you prime it with the first …

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  • 28 June

    Pooling society’s collective intelligence helped fight COVID – it must help fight future crises too

    Wisiel/Shutterstock Aleks Berditchevskaia, Nesta and Kathy Peach, Nesta A Global Pandemic Radar is to be created to detect new COVID variants and other emerging diseases. Led by the WHO, the project aims to build an international network of surveillance hubs, set up to share data that’ll help us monitor vaccine resistance, track diseases and identify new ones as they emerge. …

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  • 27 June

    How palm oil became the world’s most hated, most used fat source

    Oil palm fruit in North Aceh, Indonesia. Fachrul Reza / Barcroft Media via Getty Images Jonathan E. Robins, Michigan Technological University Palm oil is everywhere today: in food, soap, lipstick, even newspaper ink. It’s been called the world’s most hated crop because of its association with deforestation in Southeast Asia. But despite boycott campaigns, the world uses more palm oil …

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