Tag Archives: Ancient Greece

A Turkish harem on the Acropolis? It’s most likely a Greek myth

Fotokon/Shutterstock Janric van Rookhuijzen, Utrecht University The Acropolis of Athens counts among the world’s greatest architectural and artistic monuments. Visitors come to admire the marble buildings that testify to the glory of Ancient Greece more than two millennia ago. Typically, only little attention is paid to the site’s rich medieval and Ottoman history. But one of the few stories commonly …

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How ancient Babylonian land surveyors developed a unique form of trigonometry — 1,000 years before the Greeks

This stone tablet records the restoration of certain lands by the Babylonian king Nabu-apla-iddina to a priest. Babylonian, circa 870 BCE. From Sippar (Tell Abu Habbah) Wikipedia Daniel Mansfield, UNSW Our modern understanding of trigonometry harks back to ancient Greek astronomers studying the movement of celestial bodies through the night sky. But in 2017, I showed the ancient Babylonians likely …

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La Escuela de Traductores de Toledo, el eslabón perdido de la historia de la cultura europea

Mapa de Toledo obra de Joris Hoefnagel, procedente de ‘Civitates orbis terrarum’, de Braun and Hogenberg, 1572. Historic Cities Eva Aladro Vico, Universidad Complutense de Madrid Solemos explicar el desarrollo de la cultura, la ciencia y la civilización europeas con líneas históricas que enlazan el legado greco–romano, con sus avances y hallazgos en los campos de la cultura y la …

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Severed limbs and wooden feet: how the ancients invented prosthetics

Jane Draycott, University of Glasgow We are living through an incredibly exciting period for prosthetics. A pioneering brain computer interface that will allow veterans to control artificial body parts with their minds was recently announced by researchers in Virginia in the US. Meanwhile, Newcastle University in the UK is developing limbs which “see” objects in front of them and react …

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Illegal trade in antiquities: a scourge that has gone on for millennia too long

h. Evangelos Kyriakidis, University of Kent Looting of artefacts has always been a sign of military might or economic power. Over millennia, conquering generals would take away with them trophies to adorn their cities. In more recent centuries, the wealthy upper classes would make “grand tours” of classical sites and acquire – through whatever means – anything from vases to …

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