Tag Archives: Conservation

Early trauma affects an elephant’s ability to assess threat from lions – new research

Graeme Shannon, Bangor University It’s not only humans who suffer from the long-term effects of childhood trauma. In our latest research we discovered that there appears to be a very real and lasting impact on elephants who experienced trauma and profound social disruption many decades earlier. Families of African elephants who had witnessed their parents being culled appeared less able …

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Five things we learned about the state of the planet at the world’s biggest meeting of biodiversity experts

Louise Gentle, Nottingham Trent University Every four years, some of the biggest issues facing the planet are thrashed out in a global meeting of conservation scientists. The International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), the global authority on the status of the natural world, recently hosted the World Conservation Congress in Marseille, France, which was attended by 4,000 people, …

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Conservation works better when local communities lead it, new evidence shows

Mangrove reforestation project in Belo-sur-Mer, southwestern Madagascar. Author, Author provided Neil Dawson, University of East Anglia; Brendan Coolsaet, Institut catholique de Lille (ICL), and Julián Idrobo, University of British Columbia We are currently facing a mass extinction of plants and animals. To remedy this, world leaders have pledged a huge expansion of protected areas ahead of the UN biodiversity summits …

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Rewilding: four tips to let nature thrive

Sophie Wynne-Jones, Bangor University; Ian Convery, University of Cumbria, and Steve Carver, University of Leeds What would rewilding mean for a country like the UK? Bringing back wolves and bears? Returning the land to how it looked in prehistoric times? How will people fit into this wild and unimaginably different place? Questions like these abound whenever rewilding is in the …

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Paradox lost: wetlands can form in deserts, but we need to find and protect them

An oasis in the Sahara Desert, Libya. Patrick Poendl/Shutterstock Stephen Tooth, Aberystwyth University; Peyton Lisenby, Midwestern State University, and Timothy J. Ralph, Macquarie University Once dismissed as dank and bug-infested backwaters – good only for draining and destroying to make farmland – the world’s wetlands may finally be having their moment in the sun. In the UK, the government is …

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To save wild chimpanzees, imagine their habitat is an electrical circuit

Marcel Derweduwen/Shutterstock Noemie Bonnin, Liverpool John Moores University; Alexander Piel, UCL, and Fiona Stewart, Liverpool John Moores University The chimpanzee is our closest living relative, and it could be facing extinction. There were one million chimpanzees in 1900, but today, 300,000 at most are thought to remain in the wild. Prime African rainforest habitat is being broken up by loggers …

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How we discovered three new species of penguin in the Southern Ocean

P. poncetii in South Georgia. Gemma Clucas Jane Younger, University of Bath When you think of scientists discovering new species, you might imagine searching the Amazon rainforest for new types of insect or the depths of the ocean for undiscovered crustaceans. But these days most new species we discover are found hiding in plain sight. Such “hidden” species can look …

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To save threatened plants and animals, restore habitat on farms, ranches and other working lands

Planting strips of native prairie grasses on a farm in Iowa provides habitat for pollinators and protects soil and water. Omar de Kok-Mercado/Iowa State University, CC BY-ND Lucas Alejandro Garibaldi, Universidad Nacional de Rio Negro; Claire Kremen, University of British Columbia; Erle C. Ellis, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and Sandra Díaz, Universidad de Córdoba (Argentina) The Research Brief is …

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How to reverse global wildlife declines by 2050

Wouter Taljaard/Shutterstock

Wouter Taljaard/Shutterstock Michael Obersteiner, University of Oxford; David Leclère, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), and Piero Visconti, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) Species are going extinct at an unprecedented rate. Wildlife populations have fallen by more than two-thirds over the last 50 years, according to a new report from the World Wildlife Fund. The sharpest declines …

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