Tag Archives: Corepaedia

Homo who? A new mystery human species has been discovered in Israel

Homo Yossi Zaidner Michelle Langley, Griffith University An international group of archaeologists have discovered a missing piece in the story of human evolution. Excavations at the Israeli site of Nesher Ramla have recovered a skull that may represent a late-surviving example of a distinct Homo population, which lived in and around modern-day Israel from about 420,000 to 120,000 years ago. …

Read More »

Learning to read starts earlier than you might think: five tips from an expert

Learning to read. aijiro/Shutterstock Karen Boardman, Edge Hill University Learning to read does not begin when a child puzzles over the words in a book for the first time. In the early weeks of their lives and even before birth, babies are skilfully processing important information about the sounds they hear. They are attuning to tones, patterns of language and …

Read More »

How to turn confrontation about Africa’s biggest hydropower dam to cooperation

The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam, Ethiopia. Photo by Gallo Images/Orbital Horizon/Copernicus Sentinel Data 2020 Hisham Eldardiry, University of Washington Since Ethiopia announced the construction of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) in 2011, there have been disagreements between Egypt and Ethiopia on the filling and operation of the dam. With turbines of about 5100 MW it has more than two …

Read More »

Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe’s release may depend on the UK repaying its debt to Iran – but can it lawfully pay?

Alexandra Fowler, University of Westminster Richard Ratcliffe’s efforts to secure the release of his wife Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe from Iran, where she has been detained for over five years for “national security-related” offences, have failed to bear fruit, despite his recent 21-day hunger strike outside the UK Foreign Office. The sticking point, according to many observers, is the UK’s continuing non-payment …

Read More »

Black and Asian women are more likely to experience stillbirth or die during pregnancy: why and what can be done

wavebreakmedia/Shutterstock Sally Pezaro, Coventry University and Amanda Firth, University of Huddersfield Adverse birth outcomes in England – which include stillborn babies, premature birth, low birth weight and the death of the mother during pregnancy or after birth – are closely linked to inequality. A report on maternal deaths in the UK has found that in comparison to white women, black …

Read More »

Bringing people of different faiths together to solve the world’s problems is a noble goal – but it’s hard to know what it achieves

Wall art of Indian Hindu and Muslim hugging each other in religious tolerance and harmony. Reddees/Shutterstock Katherine O’Lone, University of Cambridge and Julian Hargreaves, University of Cambridge An estimated 84% of the global population identifies with a religion. This is over 6.5 billion people. Among thousands of world religions, Christianity is the largest, with 2.3 billion followers. The second, and …

Read More »

Overtraining probably isn’t behind your weight loss plateau – here’s why

Some people claim that stress from overtraining is the reason people struggle to lose weight. InesBazdar/ Shutterstock John Hough, Nottingham Trent University When it comes to improving our physical fitness, the time you don’t spend exercising (often known as “recovery”) is as important as the exercise and training you do. Not only is recovery important for anyone who wants to …

Read More »

We mapped every large solar plant on the planet using satellites and machine learning

Jenson / shutterstock Lucas Kruitwagen, University of Oxford An astonishing 82% decrease in the cost of solar photovoltaic (PV) energy since 2010 has given the world a fighting chance to build a zero-emissions energy system which might be less costly than the fossil-fuelled system it replaces. The International Energy Agency projects that PV solar generating capacity must grow ten-fold by …

Read More »

¿Adiós a los pupitres? Por qué en el colegio los niños deberían estar de pie en lugar de sentados

Shutterstock / Studio Romantic Joaquín Mateu Mollá, Universidad Internacional de Valencia Imaginemos por un momento el aula en la que recibíamos lecciones durante nuestra niñez o adolescencia. En este entrañable viaje mental redescubriremos, seguramente, una sucesión de pupitres alineados en filas, donde cada uno de nosotros tenía su lugar inamovible. Aquellas habitaciones eran espacios más o menos ordenados. Estaban diseñados …

Read More »