Tag Archives: History

Moon Knight – an Egyptologist on how the series gets the gods right

Khonshu the moon God takes centre stage in Marvel’s Moon Knight. Marvel/Disney Claire Gilmour, University of Bristol Marvel’s Moon Knight follows Steven Grant who, despite living quietly as a museum gift shop employee, finds himself drawn into the strange world of Egyptian gods. He discovers that he has other personalities – mainly Marc Spector, a human vessel who is being …

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‘Sallets’ – how to eat healthily the 1600s way

Geo-grafika/Shutterstock Catie Gill, Loughborough University and Sara Read, Loughborough University When we think of food in the past, it is often images of Henry VIII with a table groaning with meat dishes that springs to mind. But in fact our ancestors knew more about the health benefits of eating salads – normally thought of as a cold dish of herbs …

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Partitioning Syria is not the answer – it’s a mistake we’ve made before

It is hard to imagine what a partitioned Syria would look like. Reuters/Omar Sanadiki Anthony Billingsley, UNSW Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull recently raised, as part of a political solution to Syria’s ongoing violence, the possibility of partition. In doing so, he joined a significant body of opinion – especially among US neoconservatives – that promote the idea. Partitioning has …

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New archaeology finding shows how Muslim cuisine endured in secret despite policing by the Spanish Catholic regime

Andalusi communal dining bowls known as ‘ataifores’ in El Legado Andalusí, Museum of the Alhambra, Granada. Author provided Aleks Pluskowski, University of Reading; Guillermo García-Contreras Ruiz, Universidad de Granada, and Marcos García García, University of York Granada, in southern Spain’s Andalusia region, was the final remnant of Islamic Iberia known as al-Andalus – a territory that once stretched across most …

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A history of sugar – the food nobody needs, but everyone craves

Sweeter Alternative/Flickr, CC BY-NC Mark Horton, University of Bristol; Philip Langton, University of Bristol, and R. Alexander Bentley, University of Houston It seems as though no other substance occupies so much of the world’s land, for so little benefit to humanity, as sugar. According to the latest data, sugarcane is the world’s third most valuable crop after cereals and rice, …

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Rethinking how we look at Africa’s relationship with China

The framing of Africa’s relationship with China needs a rethink. Shutterstock Christopher J. Lee, Lafayette College The topic of China-Africa relations presents an opportunity to rethink the territorial parameters of African studies. In particular, it can help shift attention away from the Atlantic world as the dominant focal point of connections between Africa and the wider world. The problem is …

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New archaeology finding shows how Muslim cuisine endured in secret despite policing by the Spanish Catholic regime

Andalusi communal dining bowls known as ‘ataifores’ in El Legado Andalusí, Museum of the Alhambra, Granada. Author provided Aleks Pluskowski, University of Reading; Guillermo García-Contreras Ruiz, Universidad de Granada, and Marcos García García, University of York Granada, in southern Spain’s Andalusia region, was the final remnant of Islamic Iberia known as al-Andalus – a territory that once stretched across most …

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Chine-Kazakhstan : vers un glacis eurasien ?

Emmanuel Véron, Institut national des langues et civilisations orientales (Inalco) et Emmanuel Lincot, Institut Catholique de Paris Indépendant depuis 1991, à la suite de l’effondrement de l’URSS, le Kazakhstan, véritable État-continent (2 724 900 km2, ce qui en fait le neuvième plus grand pays du monde) qui dispose de 2 % des réserves mondiales de pétrole, ainsi que de la deuxième réserve mondiale d’uranium, …

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Onions, embroidery and other historical lessons could help you sleep

John Collier / Wikimedia Commons Sasha Handley, University of Manchester Most developed societies in the West are currently plagued by endemic sleep loss, falling well short of the eight hours recommended by the World Health Organisation. In particular, many children and young people are currently suffering from sleeping problems. A recent BBC documentary went so far as to label this …

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A brief history of Christmas Pudding – and why it can actually be quite good for you

Olesia Reshetnikova/Shutterstock Hazel Flight, Edge Hill University Even in these hard and strange times, Christmas will be celebrated and traditions upheld. And for many British households, Christmas dinner would not be complete without a Christmas pudding – traditionally served with brandy sauce, brandy butter or custard. The Christmas pudding originated in the 14th-century as a sort of porridge, originally known …

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