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Tag Archives: Iraq

Iraq’s discontent – its roots and how to begin fixing it

Murtaja Lateef/EPA

Bamo Nouri, City, University of London Iraq’s recent wave of protests against poverty, a lack of basic services, unemployment, and the interference of Iran in the country’s domestic affairs showed a country at the end of its tether. Official figures put the number killed in the violent crackdown of protesters at 157. Since 2011, protests and popular movements that challenged …

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Fears grow for safety of Iraq’s cultural heritage under ISIS

This Assyrian winged bull is safe in Chicago, if far from home. How much else is safe? Trjames, CC BY-SA

This Assyrian winged bull is safe in Chicago, if far from home. How much else is safe? Trjames, CC BY-SA Eleanor Robson, UCL Iraq has a long and rich heritage, home for thousands of years to mighty empires – Assyria and Babylon, the Abbasid caliphate – that ruled the region once known as Mesopotamia, widely held as the cradle of …

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The Iraq War has cost the US nearly $2 trillion

Packed and ready to leave? Perhaps not quite yet. Capt. Robyn Haake/US Army/AFP via Getty Images

Packed and ready to leave? Perhaps not quite yet. Capt. Robyn Haake/US Army/AFP via Getty Images Neta C. Crawford, Boston University Editor’s note: The Costs of Wars project was started in 2011 to assess the long-term consequences of the post-9/11 wars. Project co-director Neta C. Crawford, professor and chair of political science at Boston University, explains the major implications of …

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Three ancient cities to rival London, Paris and New York

Daviegunn/Wikimedia commons

Daviegunn/Wikimedia commons Zena Kamash, Royal Holloway London, Paris and New York are global cities: modern hubs for travel, technology and trade, their names and images echo around the globe, capturing our imaginations with their distinctive histories, famous residents and iconic landmarks. Cities, such as these, which connect with the wider world become mixing pots for a rich interplay of diverse …

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How Iraq’s relationship with Iran shifted after the fall of Saddam Hussein

Saddam Hussein: on trial in 2006 in Baghdad. Nikola Solic/EPA

Johan Franzen, University of East Anglia Following his capture by American troops, Saddam Hussein made a startling admission to George Piro, the FBI investigator tasked with interrogating him. The reason he had played cat and mouse with UN weapons inspectors for over a decade was not because he was trying to hide Iraqi production of weapons of mass destruction from …

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US refusal to withdraw troops from Iraq is a breach of international law

Supporters of Iraqi Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr demonstrate against the US presence in Iraq on January 24. Ahmed Jalil/EPA

Andrew G Jones, Coventry University A US strike which killed Iranian general Qassem Soleimani in Baghdad in January, and the counter-strike by the Iranian military on US targets in Iraq, raised serious questions about the legitimate use of force. When military force was used against targets within its territory, Iraq’s sovereignty was breached. As a country caught in the middle …

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Severed limbs and wooden feet: how the ancients invented prosthetics

Jane Draycott, University of Glasgow We are living through an incredibly exciting period for prosthetics. A pioneering brain computer interface that will allow veterans to control artificial body parts with their minds was recently announced by researchers in Virginia in the US. Meanwhile, Newcastle University in the UK is developing limbs which “see” objects in front of them and react …

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Why a 2,500-year-old Hebrew poem still matters

Gebhard Fugel, ‘An den Wassern Babylons.’ Gebhard Fugel [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Gebhard Fugel, ‘An den Wassern Babylons.’ Gebhard Fugel [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons David W. Stowe, Michigan State University At sundown on July 29, Jews around the world will observe Tisha B’av, the most somber of Jewish holidays. It commemorates the destruction of the two temples in Jerusalem, first by the Babylonians and then, almost seven centuries later, in A.D. …

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On Yom Kippur, remembering Mosul’s rich and diverse past

A 1932 photograph showing the minaret of the Great Mosque of al-Nuri, Mosul. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

A 1932 photograph showing the minaret of the Great Mosque of al-Nuri, Mosul. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. Stephennie Mulder, University of Texas at Austin On Yom Kippur each year, as Jews around the world pray for atonement, the biblical Book of Jonah is read in its entirety. Jews recall the story of how God summons …

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