Tag Archives: Africa

The hunt for coronavirus variants: how the new one was found and what we know so far

Scientists find variants by sequencing samples from people that have tested positive for the virus. Lightspring/Shutterstock Prof. Wolfgang Preiser, Stellenbosch University; Cathrine Scheepers, University of the Witwatersrand; Jinal Bhiman, National Institute for Communicable Diseases; Marietjie Venter, University of Pretoria, and Tulio de Oliveira, University of KwaZulu-Natal Since early in the COVID pandemic, the Network for Genomics Surveillance in South Africa …

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Renewable energy is fuelling a forgotten conflict in Africa’s last colony

SAHARALAND / shutterstock Joanna Allan, Northumbria University, Newcastle Morocco has positioned itself as a global leader in the fight against climate change, with one of the highest-rated national action plans. But though the north African country intends to generate half its electricity from renewables by 2030, its plans show that much of this energy will come from wind and solar …

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What African countries got out of COP26

In January 2015, a three-day rain displaced nearly quarter of a million people, devastated 64,000 hectares of land, and killed several hundred people in Malawi. Ashley Cooper/Getty Images Mouhamadou Bamba Sylla, African Institute for Mathematical Sciences The 26th United Nations climate change conference, COP26, recently came to an end, having aimed to get countries united in the fight against climate …

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Médecins sans frontières, un pionnier du « business model » des ONG

Michel Ferrary, SKEMA Business School Qu’elles soient du domaine de l’humanitaire, de la protection de la nature ou de la défense des droits de l’homme, les organisations non gouvernementales (ONG) constituent des acteurs majeurs de nos sociétés dont l’importance ne cesse de croître. Médecins sans frontières (MSF) en est le parfait exemple. Créée en France en décembre 1971, cette start-up …

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Research reveals humans ventured out of Africa repeatedly as early as 400,000 years ago, to visit the rolling grasslands of Arabia

Eleanor Scerri, Author provided Julien Louys, Griffith University; Gilbert Price, The University of Queensland; Huw Groucutt, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, and Michael Petraglia, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History If you stood in the middle of the Nefud Desert in central Arabia today, you’d be confronted on all sides by enormous sand …

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How to turn confrontation about Africa’s biggest hydropower dam to cooperation

The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam, Ethiopia. Photo by Gallo Images/Orbital Horizon/Copernicus Sentinel Data 2020 Hisham Eldardiry, University of Washington Since Ethiopia announced the construction of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) in 2011, there have been disagreements between Egypt and Ethiopia on the filling and operation of the dam. With turbines of about 5100 MW it has more than two …

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Dirty secrets: sediment DNA reveals a 300,000-year timeline of ancient and modern humans living in Siberia

Collection of sediment DNA samples in the Main Chamber of Denisova Cave. Bert Roberts, Author provided Elena Zavala, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology; Matthias Meyer, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology; Richard ‘Bert’ Roberts, University of Wollongong, and Zenobia Jacobs, University of Wollongong In the foothills of the Altai Mountains in southern Siberia lies Denisova Cave. It is the …

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Deaths from landmines are on the rise – and clearing them all will take decades

Sam Clarke, University of Sheffield Nearly quarter of a century after most of the world signed a convention outlawing the use of antipersonnel landmines, the number of people being killed or maimed by these insidious and lethal weapons remains high – and rising. The Landmine Monitor for 2021, released on November 10, reported 7,073 casualties in 2020, including 2,492 people …

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Agreements that favour Egypt’s rights to Nile waters are an anachronism

The Nile River during sunset in Luxor, Egypt. EPA-EFE/Khaled Elfiqi Salam Abdulqadir Abdulrahman, University of Human Development, Iraq Egypt has historically adopted an aggressive approach to the flow of the River Nile. Cairo considers the Nile a national security matter and statements continue to include threats of military action against Ethiopia should it interfere with the flow as set out …

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