Tag Archives: Corepaedia

The war against plastic is distracting us from pollution that cannot be seen

FocusDzign / shutterstock Thomas Stanton, Nottingham Trent University; Matthew Johnson, University of Nottingham, and Paul Kay, University of Leeds The war against plastic may be overshadowing greater threats to the environment. In a collaboration with experts from the environmental sciences, engineering, industry, policy and charities, we have written a paper in the journal WIREs Water which highlights concerns that relatively …

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How to stay socially connected as lockdown returns – according to science

giuseppelombardo/Shutterstock Pascal Vrticka, University of Essex and Philip J. Cozzolino, University of Essex After a fairly relaxed summer, more and more places are bringing back tighter restrictions in response to rising COVID-19 cases, with some even returning to full or near-full lockdowns. We all know that social distancing makes sense: the fewer people we meet (and the further away from …

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Peace in Sudan: patience is required for the long road ahead

General Abdel Fattah al-Burhan, left, and Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok at an October 2020 ceremony celebrating the peace deal. Ebrahim Hamid/AFP via Getty Images David E Kiwuwa, University of Nottingham “End the wars” and “peace in our land” were the rallying cries for the protests that ultimately ousted Sudan’s long-ruling strongman Omar al-Bashir in 2019. The country had been afflicted …

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Gaining knowledge is what makes a degree valuable, not graduate salaries or transferable skills

PhotoSky/Shutterstock Paul Ashwin, Lancaster University The unexpected social and economic challenges brought by the coronavirus pandemic have given increased urgency to questions about the purposes of a university education and the kinds of graduates that society needs. Much of this debate has focused on the extent to which university degrees lead to graduate jobs and higher graduate salaries. For example, …

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Healthy soil for healthy plants for healthy humans

The human gut microbiome is a complex system of gazillions of bacteria, fungi, viruses, protists and archaea that has an enormous effect on our metabolism, health and well‐being. The same holds true for the plant rhizosphere, where the roots are immersed in a soil microbiome that provides plants with important nutrients, protects them from disease and pathogens, and helps them …

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Aerial images detect and track food security threats for millions of African farmers

An early warning system detects and prevents diseases in banana, a key food security crop in Africa. It relies on machine learning and imagery collected by mobile phones, drones and satellites INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR TROPICAL AGRICULTURE (CIAT) IMAGE: A GROUND-LEVEL VIEW OF A BANANA PLANT AFFECTED BY XANTHOMONAS WILT OR (BXW). view more  CREDIT: MICHAEL SELVARAJ / INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR TROPICAL AGRICULTURE New …

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Literary prizes and the problem with the UK publishing industry

Pexels Jamie Harris, Aberystwyth University This year’s Booker prize shortlist offers the most diverse lineup ever with four female and two male writers, four of who are people of colour. But while the diversity of the 2020 shortlist for the best original novel is to be commended, the majority of the publishers of Booker-winning novels are still based in London. …

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How to support white British trainee teachers in their thinking and teaching about black British histories

Monkey Business Images/Shutterstock Marlon Moncrieffe, University of Brighton Black British history plays a significant role in the formation of British cultural identity and the history of the UK, and ought to be taught as such in UK schools. But evidence from my research on primary school teaching and learning about history and national identity shows that white British teachers – …

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La Alhambra aún guarda secretos: descubrimientos en el Patio de los Leones

Nicomedes de Mendivil (dib.), Esteban Buxó (grab.). Detalle de templete y mocárabes en el Patio de los Leones de la Alhambra. Publicado en “Monumentos Arquitectónicos de España”, cuaderno nº 27, 1865 [col. particular]. Antonio Gámiz Gordo, Universidad de Sevilla Ningún otro rincón de la Alhambra de Granada, incluida en la lista de Patrimonio Mundial de la UNESCO, despierta tanto interés …

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Lo que significaba ser bueno o malo en el antiguo Egipto

Dioses del tribunal en el juicio final del difunto tocados e inspirados con la pluma de Maat (pap. funerario de época ptolemaica, 200 a. C.; Metropolitan Museum of Art, pieza cat. MMA 66.99.142) Metropolitan Museum of Art Antonio J. Morales Rondán, Universidad de Alcalá En el antiguo Egipto no había una sola palabra para definir el bien o el mal. …

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