Tag Archives: corepaedianews

Five books on work by French authors that you should read on your commute

shutterstock Amy Wigelsworth, Sheffield Hallam University An emerging genre of fiction in France is providing an unlikely brand of escapism. Growing numbers of French writers are choosing work as their subject matter – and it seems that readers can’t get enough of their novels. The prix du roman d’entreprise et du travail, the French prize for the best business or …

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Turmeric: here’s how it actually measures up to health claims

Most of turmeric’s reported health benefits are linked to compounds called curcuminoids. tarapong srichaiyos/ Shutterstock Duane Mellor, Aston University Turmeric has been used by humans for more than 4,000 years. As well as cooking and cosmetics, it’s been a staple of the traditional medicine practice of Ayurveda, used to treat a variety of conditions from arthritis to wind. Even today …

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Women’s secret war: the inside story of how the US military sent female soldiers on covert combat missions to Afghanistan

US marines with a female engagement team in southern Helmand province, Afghanistan, in May 2012. Cpl. Meghan Gonzales/DVIDS Jennifer Greenburg, University of Sheffield A US Army handbook from 2011 opens one of its chapters with a line from Rudyard Kipling’s poem The Young British Soldier. Written in 1890 upon Kipling’s return to England from India, an experienced imperial soldier gives …

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Five books to read while in the Derbyshire countryside

Lukasz Pajor/Shuttertsock Heather Green, Nottingham Trent University The Derbyshire countryside, in England’s East Midlands, is a region that has inspired writers – both classic and contemporary. The juxtaposition of rolling hills, stark moorland and craggy summits play backdrop to numerous novels in a variety of genres. The area is easily reached from a number of large cities – but parts …

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Sudan’s people toppled a dictator – despite the war they’re still working to bring about democratic change

Civilians protest in Sudan’s capital, Khartoum, in December 2022. AFP via Getty Images Linda Bishai, George Washington University While Sudan’s generals have unleashed indiscriminate destruction and occupation on wide swaths of the capital, Khartoum, neighbourhood resistance committees and pro-democracy activists have stepped up to respond to the needs of citizens. They have risked their lives to drive people to safety …

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The Nakba: how the Palestinians were expelled from Israel

Evicted: about 750,000 Palestinians were killed or expelled from their land during the Nakba which began on May 15 1948. Anas-Mohammed/Shutterstock Marwan Darweish, Coventry University Until 1948, Lajjun was a small village about ten miles south of Nazareth in one of the most fertile valleys in Palestine. Since 1949, the area has been occupied by Jewish settlers who established Kibbutz …

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Why some people lose their accents but others don’t – linguistic expert

FGC/Shutterstock Jane Setter, University of Reading The way a person speaks is an intrinsic part of their identity. It’s tribal, marking a speaker as being from one social group or another. Accents are a sign of belonging as much as something that separates communities. Yet we can probably all think of examples of people who seem to have “lost” their …

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The world’s first Islamic art biennale shines a light on African artists

Marco Cappelletti/OMA/Islamic Arts Biennale Sumayya Vally, UCL The inaugural Islamic Arts Biennale is underway in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. (Biennales are large and prestigious international art exhibitions held every two years.) This important new event for the Muslim world features numerous African artists. And the biennale’s artistic director is Sumayya Vally, a South African architecture professor and principal of Counterspace design …

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