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Tag Archives: coronavirus

The common cold might protect you from coronavirus – here’s how

The common cold is usually caused by a rhinovirus. Shutterstock/fizkes Matthew James, Queen’s University Belfast We often assume that viral infections are caused by individual virus types. But in reality, we’re exposed to many viruses on a day to day basis, and co-infection – where someone is simultaneously infected by two or more virus types – is quite common. The …

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COVID-19: men create more antibodies after asymptomatic infections and keep them for longer – new research

maybealice/Shutterstock Jessica Williams, Cardiff Metropolitan University As COVID-19 has swept across the globe, it seems that high transmission rates have partly been driven by a large number of people catching the virus, not experiencing symptoms and then unknowingly passing it on. Despite this, the screening of asymptomatic people for signs of infection hasn’t been widespread, due to costs and limits …

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Handshakes and hugs are good for you – it’s vital they make a comeback after the pandemic

Krakenimages.com/Shuttersstock Simon Nicholas Williams, Swansea University and Kimberly Dienes, Swansea University When was the last time you shook someone’s hand, or kissed them on the cheek to say hello? The pandemic has put a stop to these simple gestures, while social distancing and strict hygiene practices have become part of our everyday lives as a necessary way of minimising the …

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How lockdown changed the sex lives of young adults – new research

Liam Wignall, Bournemouth University and Mark McCormack, University of Roehampton Lockdown significantly affected our health (for good and bad), our work and how we socialise. These consequences have been widely discussed, but far less attention has been given to the effect on our sex lives. When lockdown came into force in the UK in March 2020, people from outside the …

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COVID-19 vaccines are a victory for public research, not ‘greed’ and ‘capitalism’

David Whyte, University of Liverpool Boris Johnson, the UK prime minister, reportedly attributed the success of the COVID-19 vaccines to “capitalism” and “greed”. But he is wrong – the idea that private ingenuity and naked competition produced the vaccines is a complete fantasy. Before COVID-19, the vaccine market was notoriously sluggish, taking between five and 15 years to develop a …

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The WHO report into the origin of the coronavirus is out. Here’s what happens next, says the Australian doctor who went to China

Dominic Dwyer, University of Sydney The World Health Organization (WHO) overnight released its report into the origins of the coronavirus, a report I contributed to as a member of the recent mission to Wuhan, China. The report outlines our now well-publicised findings: SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, most likely arose in bats, and then spread to humans via an …

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COVID-19 vaccines are highly effective for pregnant women and their babies – new study

New infectious diseases come with all kinds of risks for women during pregnancy and childbirth. https://www.pexels.com/, FAL Catherine Thornton, Swansea University and April Rees, Swansea University COVID-19 vaccines are proving highly effective in pregnancy, according to a newly published study in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. It has also found that mothers who have been vaccinated are passing …

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What we learned from tracking every COVID policy in the world

Thomas Hale, University of Oxford In March 2020, as COVID-19 swept around the globe, my colleagues and I began debating the bewildering new measures popping up around the world with our master’s students in a politics of policymaking class at the Blavatnik School of Government at Oxford University. We had a lot of questions. Why were governments doing different things? …

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