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TimeLine Layout

July, 2021

  • 27 July

    The Taliban: what could its return to power mean for Afghanistan?

    Kaweh Kerami, SOAS, University of London The Taliban is typically portrayed as a group of men with beards and turbans, driven by Islamic fundamentalist ideology and responsible for widespread violence. But to understand the group that is poised to return to power in Afghanistan, and what we might expect from its rule, we need a much more nuanced picture. To …

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  • 27 July

    Covid-19 : que sait-on du variant Lambda, désormais présent dans 29 pays ?

    Tara Hurst, Birmingham City University Le Pérou est de loin le pays qui compte le plus grand nombre de décès dus au Covid-19 par habitant. 596 décès sur 100 000 habitants sont dus à la maladie. Ce bilan est presque deux fois plus élevé que celui du second pays le plus touché par la pandémie, la Hongrie, où sont dénombrés 307 décès pour 100 000 habitants. Plusieurs …

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  • 26 July

    Mozambique’s fossil fuel drive is entrenching poverty and conflict

    Oil and gas extraction can have dire consequences for the countries in which it takes place. ARMBRUSTERBIZ/Pixabay Joshua Kirshner, University of York; Daniela Salite, University of York, and Matthew Cotton, Teesside University Earlier this year, militants stormed the coastal town of Palma, Mozambique, which lies close to vast plants for extracting liquefied natural gas (LNG). Dozens of people were killed …

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  • 25 July

    Covid-19 : que sait-on du variant Delta (et des autres) ?

    Samuel Alizon, Institut de recherche pour le développement (IRD) and Mircea T. Sofonea, Université de Montpellier Comme tous les êtres vivants, le virus SARS-CoV-2 évolue. Au cours de chaque infection sont produits des milliards de nouvelles particules virales. Parmi ces nouveaux virus, certains sont porteurs de mutations. Ce processus d’évolution et cette génération de mutants ont été étudiés en détail. …

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  • 25 July

    Monks Wood Wilderness: 60 years ago, scientists let a farm field rewild – here’s what happened

    UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Author provided Richard K Broughton, University of Oxford In the archive of the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology there is a typed note from the 1960s that planted the seed of an idea. Written by Kenneth Mellanby, director of the Monks Wood Experimental Station, a former research centre in Cambridgeshire, UK, the note …

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  • 24 July

    La inteligencia artificial nos ayuda a estudiar la fauna de Doñana para mejorar su conservación

    Imágenes de fototrampeo tomadas en el Parque Nacional de Doñana. Author provided Simone Santoro, Universidad de Huelva; Isaac Pérez Borrero, Universidad de Huelva; Javier Calzada, Universidad de Huelva, and Manuel Emilio Gegúndez Arias, Universidad de Huelva El fototrampeo es una técnica que permite tomar imágenes y vídeos de la fauna silvestre de forma autónoma y sin perturbarla. De este modo, …

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  • 24 July

    How One Man In Egypt Is Keeping This 200-Year-Old Tile Tradition Alive

    Saied Hussain has been hand making tiles out of cement for over 50 years. He says he’s one of the last still doing this work in Egypt — most other workshops couldn’t withstand competition from marble and ceramic tiles. We went to Cairo to see how his business is still standing. Saied does not have a website. He sells his …

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  • 23 July

    Why Japanese Melons Are So Expensive

    From the Yubari King, to the Andes, the Higo Green Melon and many more. Melons are grown up and down Japan and they’re serious business. In May 2019, two melons from Hokkaido sold at auction for 5 million yen, that’s just over $45,000. So what is it that makes this fruit so expensive?

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  • 23 July

    Tokyo 2020 – how Japan’s bid for soft power victory has been roundly defeated by the pandemic

    Simon Chadwick, EM Lyon and Paul Widdop, Leeds Beckett University Even before it begins, holding the Olympic Games in Tokyo has felt like an energy-sapping endurance event. Originally scheduled for last summer and postponed due to the pandemic, the decision to go ahead has been widely questioned. As the action unfolds, Japan’s capital city will be under a state of …

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  • 22 July

    Billionaire space race: the ultimate symbol of capitalism’s flawed obsession with growth

    Tom Leishman/Pexels Tim Jackson, University of Surrey Mars ain’t the kind of place to raise your kids, laments the Rocket Man in Elton John’s timeless classic. In fact, it’s cold as hell. But that doesn’t seem to worry a new generation of space entrepreneurs intent on colonising the “final frontier” as fast as possible. Don’t get me wrong. I’m no …

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